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sensitiveteenager: ghettablasta: Damn, this is so good OMGGG

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sensitiveteenager:

ghettablasta:

Damn, this is so good

OMGGG

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adamcole
2 days ago
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LOOK AT HOW BEAUTIFUL.
Philadelphia, PA, USA
MaryEllenCG
5 days ago
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Greater Bostonia
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parmandil: teashoesandhair: teashoesandhair: This is a Mills...

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parmandil:

teashoesandhair:

teashoesandhair:

This is a Mills & Boon from 1967 and honestly I don’t know what I’d do if I met someone and they said ‘with those hands she simply must play the piano’ but it would probably end in tears

For those asking, this is from ‘When Love is Blind’ by Mary Burchell, aka Ida Cook. My New Year’s Resolution is to try and read books by really interesting authors, and Ida Cook comes under that umbrella category because:

  • she was singularly and bizarrely obsessed with opera, along with her sister, Louise Cook
  • she wrote about 112 romance novels in her life 
  • during WW2, these two facts became incredibly useful because she and her sister were badass ladies who used the money that Ida earnt from selling romance books to smuggle Jewish people’s possessions across the border from Germany, helping Jewish refugees to satisfy Britain’s financial criteria for immigration
  • they literally used to go to Germany dozens of times a year to ‘see operas’, dressed in plain clothes, and would come back to Britain dressed in about eight layers of gold and finery
  • they did also actually see operas
  • when officials got suspicious about how many goddamn clothes and items of jewellery they were wearing at one time, they pretended that they were spinsters who didn’t trust their families at home not to sell their belongings, and so they wore all their best clothes and jewellery whenever they went abroad
  • they had to super carefully plan all their crossings so that the same people who saw them travelling to Germany with no luggage at all didn’t see them travelling back to Britain in completely different outfits, laden with baggage and suitcases
  • they did this so often that officials did begin to get suspicious about how many times in a year two women could actually go to Germany just to see operas, so the director of the Munich Opera House started to arrange specific performances on dates of their choosing so that they could prove their reason for travelling. He also let them choose which performance they wanted him to put on. They must have been bloody delighted
  • many of her romance novels are about operas
  • like this one 
  • she had a bit of an opera problem, really
  • she wrote an autobiography and only about a third of it is about her heroic work helping Jewish refugees. The rest of it is about her childhood
  • just kidding, it’s about operas

“with those hands she simply must play the piano”

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adamcole
2 days ago
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Would fucking watch this movie in a heartbeat.
Philadelphia, PA, USA
bibliogrrl
7 days ago
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Chicago!
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sandalwoodandsunlight:

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sandalwoodandsunlight:

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adamcole
2 days ago
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Pretty sure ICE is our gestapo.
Philadelphia, PA, USA
MaryEllenCG
17 hours ago
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Greater Bostonia
bibliogrrl
2 days ago
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Chicago!
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The Democratic Party Is Failing To Demobilize Its Base. This Is Good.

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No, demobilize wasn’t a typo. Traditionally, after winning elections, Democratic officials, apparatchiks, and strongly-aligned pundits go out of their way to demobilize rank-and-file Democrats. One way is to claim much of what they campaigned on is impossible to achieve. Another method is to attempt to act in the spirit of bipartisanship or some other bullshit, which, translated into English, means acquiescing to Republican demands and watering down negotiating starting points. Then there’s the “Third Way”/New Democrat strategy of positioning yourself in the supposed ‘middle’, which is usually just one step to the left of Republican batshitloonitarianism (e.g., calling for middle ground on off-shore drilling days before the Deepwater Horizon blowout). Completely abandoning policies you campaigned on, such as card check (for unionization) and fixing NAFTA (maybe that should have been a priority?) also is part of the toolkit.

I have no idea if this is intentional or instinctive, but it seems to happen shortly after every election. A considerable number of Democratic voters don’t do themselves or the rest of us any favors either: after supporting Democrats during election season, there is rarely any punishment doled out to poorly-performing officials. As far as I can tell, this post-election kissing up is the primary function of sites like DailyKos (GO TEAM! YAY! WHOOHOO! Suckas.).

But with the election of Trump along with the decade-long rout at the state and local levels, rank-and-file Democrats are finally refusing to be demobilized. It’s worth noting that the last three weekends of protests, despite conservative fever dreams to the contrary, had nothing to do with the Democratic Party or establishment. Nothing. When Democrats were thinking about knuckling under on various Trump nominees the response from rank-and-file Democrats was fast and furious. It was protestors (along with many awesome immigration lawyers), not official Democratic inquiries, that stalled and stopped the immigration fiasco.

And the base is still pissed. As best as I can tell, this has less to do with policy and more with the ineffectual politics of Democratic operatives (though, obviously, policy and politics are intertwined–it’s really hard to sell shitty policies). Consider these two bloggers, who I’ve been reading for a long time and I think are to the right of me, at least on economic issues. First (boldface mine):

Really? Still? We’re still doing this? It’s 2017. We’re fully more than a decade past the time when Democrats, eager to take the high road and do the right thing and be patriotic and put country before party, sucked George W. Bush’s strap-on and were rewarded for their decency by having the war hero they nominated for president derided as a commie faggot peace-freak appeaser. We just spent eight years in which a Democratic president gave weekly speeches about nonexistent well-meaning Republicans who just disagreed on policy while they howled outside his windows burning him in effigy. And we’re still gonna do the right thing?

…I mean it, God, why? So rich fucks like Richard Blumenthal can look at themselves in the mirror and talk to their reflections about how they tried, or something? So they can feel good about themselves? So they can say they did the “right thing” as defined by some centrist think tank as its members hump the status quo like their lives depend on it? So they don’t ruffle any feathers on the half-plucked chicken we’ve placed in the executive branch? So that maybe next time they’ll get a freebie? How stupid are these people?

Would that any of you were half as interested in doing the right thing by your constituents, or by America. Would that you felt as strongly about doing the right thing for us. Would that that kept you up at night.

Schmucks.

Ed at Gin and Tacos (boldface mine):

Watching someone make the same mistake over and over again is difficult. First, you’re alarmed. Then you pity them. Then you get angry. And finally, you grow to hate them. People proceed through these stages at different speeds. Really compassionate people linger in the first two stages for a long time. Most people get to the latter stages pretty rapidly…

At this point, I don’t see how anyone is still in the shock or pity phase with the 2000s-era Democratic Party in Congress. It is impossible – or is possible for people who are of kinder heart than I – to do anything but hate them for their weakness. The way they make the same predictable mistakes over and over, the way the congressional Republicans openly bully them, and then mock them for rolling over every single time, was sad for a couple years. Maybe back during the W Bush era. Maybe it was still kind of pitiable to watch them all bow to hyperjingoism and decide to trust W on the Iraq War, even though anyone with half a brain – which includes most of them – knew that was going to go over like a lead balloon. But now it is long past being a sad sight. At this point, they know better. They’ve been through this process of getting boned dozens upon dozens of times. They “play nice” and act real Bipartisan-y and the GOP smiles and laughs and can’t believe its luck, and then when the tables are turned the GOP response to literally everything is a middle finger extended in the face. There is no reason to expect it to turn out differently, ever. The sample size is large enough after nearly 20 years of this to conclude with confidence that, no, they have no interest in doing anything but using every last available tactic – hook or crook – to prevent a Democratic president or chamber majority from being able to get anything it wants.

While Elizabeth Warren seems to understand this, it’s unclear if most Democrats do–I’m pretty certain they don’t. It will be important to keep the pressure on Democrats as much as on Republicans–and the former will be far more effective than the latter (though we should also do the latter).

We need to realize that the Iron Law of Institutions will be acting against us: there will be more than a few Democratic operatives who would rather weaken the party than lose their power within the party. The idea that Democratic voters could and should control their own party terrifies them–they might lose their seats on the gravy train. The Congressional Retirement Plan™ is still very powerful. But always remember, we have far more to lose than a Congress of millionaires, so never feel guilty or ‘disloyal’ about challenging them, pushing them, even opposing them.

Like it or not, until conditions improve, rank-and-file Democrats need to view themselves as in not-very-loyal opposition to the Democratic Party and in total opposition to Republicans.




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adamcole
7 days ago
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Stay mobilized. Call your senators and representatives, ESPECIALLY THE DEMOCRATS. Make sure they know that if they aren't interested in left politics, they're out of a job at the next reelection.
Philadelphia, PA, USA
WorldMaker
9 days ago
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Louisville, Kentucky
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berniesrevolution: Happy Black History Month

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berniesrevolution:

Happy Black History Month

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sirshannon
4 days ago
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diannemharris
7 days ago
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adamcole
7 days ago
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Philadelphia, PA, USA
bibliogrrl
9 days ago
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Chicago!
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The scansion of disapprobation expressions

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In case you missed it — Ben Zimmer recently turned his meticulous scholarly attention to the lexicographical and metrical analysis of shit-gibbon: "The Surprising Rise of the 'S—gibbon'", Slate 2/9/2017.

The metrical part:

Shitgibbon has a lot going for it, with the same punchy meter as other Trumpian epithets popularized last summer like cockwomble, fucknugget, and jizztrumpet. (Metrically speaking, these words are compounds consisting of one element with a single stressed syllable and a second disyllabic element with a trochaic pattern, i.e., stressed-unstressed. As a metrical foot in poetry, the whole stressed-stressed-unstressed pattern is known as antibacchius.)

Ben cited some historical research by Hugo van Kemenade, and adds "some insults in the same vein as shitgibbon, as collected by the indefatigable Hugo", many of which are also prosodically antibacchiac:

wankpuffin, cockwomble, fucktrumpet, dickbiscuit, twatwaffle, turdweasel, bunglecunt, shitehawk

cuntpuffin, spunkpuffin, shitpuffin; fuckwomble, twatwomble; jizztrumpet, spunktrumpet; shitbiscuit, arsebiscuits, douchebiscuit; douchewaffle, cockwaffle, fartwaffle, cuntwaffle, shitwaffle (lots of –waffles); crapweasel, fuckweasel, pissweasel, doucheweasel

He omit some old antibacchiac favorites like cocksucker, as well as up-and-coming insults like douche-nozzle.

There is a small but interesting scholarly literature on the syntax of disapprobation expressions, e.g. Quang Phuc Dong, "English sentences without overt grammatical subject", Studies out in Left Field, 1971; Boban Arsenijević, "Disapprobation expressions are vocative epithets", ACLC Working Papers 2007.  But with the exception of the related problem of expletive infixation, there's little or no research on the cross-linguistic prosody of insults.

Are certain metrical patterns really favored in English-language disapprobation expressions? Or is the apparent antibacchiacity of Hugo's lists just an artefact of the associative accumulation of examples on the basis of a striking instance like shitgibbon?

And what are the prosodic patterns of negative-valence vocative epithets in Italian, Russian, Persian, French, Mandarin, Turkish, Hebrew, Swahili, … ? This is a massively interdisciplinary problem, involving not only lexicography and metrics but also psychology, neuroscience, anthropology, sociology, and data science.

Update — More coverage by Taylor Jones: "Linguists have been discussion 'shit gibbon.' I argue it's not entirely about gibbons", Language Jones 2/92/2017.

 

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skorgu
7 days ago
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This is everything right and good in the world.
adamcole
7 days ago
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Love this article, but gotta quibble with "douche-nozzle" as up-and-coming--it's been in use in my household and circle of friends since the early aughts at least, and we were like, the squarest whitest *poets* the world has ever seen.
Philadelphia, PA, USA
hannahdraper
9 days ago
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Washington, DC
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